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Biotecnika Times – Newsletter 23.04.2019 – NCCS Pune Rs. 53,000/- Salary Job, CSIR

Biotecnika Times – Newsletter 23.04.2019 – NCCS Pune Rs. 53,000/- Salary Job, CSIR
Netaji Subhas Fellowship, Young Scientist Fellowship, Novus Biologicals Scholarship, Jobs @ NBRC, NICED + Much More

Biotecnika Times – NCCS Pune Rs. 53,000/- Salary Job, CSIR NCCS, Pune BSc & MSc Technician Post With Rs. 53,000/- Salary pm Candidates with MSc & BSc Biological / Life Sciences are encouraged to apply for Technician vacancies. Life sciences jobs for msc & bsc candidates at NCCS. MSc Biological/Lifesciences candidates apply for technician positions. […]

The post Biotecnika Times – Newsletter 23.04.2019 – NCCS Pune Rs. 53,000/- Salary Job, CSIR appeared first on BioTecNika.


Source: Biotecnika

New genomics tool ECCITE-seq expands multimodal single cell analysis

New genomics tool ECCITE-seq expands multimodal single cell analysis
ECCITE-seq (Expanded CRISPR-compatible Cellular Indexing of Transcriptomes and Epitopes by sequencing) allows researchers to perform high-throughput measurements of multiple modalities of information from single cells. The technique profiles different types of biomolecules from thousands of single cells in parallel, offering a breadth of information that can be used as readout in CRISPR-based pooled genetics screens.

Source: Sciencedaily

PhD Career Development Advice

PhD Career Development Advice

Hey all, I'm a bio-engineer starting my PhD in Pasadena (Caltech) in October. At this point in my career I'm still pretty split between academia, industry and entrepreneurship. Because of this, I hope to continue to build a profile that remains pretty well-rounded and explore these options a bit more closely. For the industry and entrepreneurship route, I was thinking of doing some work in small biotechs and venture capital groups, respectively.

I was wondering how feasible it is to setup such work experiences and if anyone had general tips with regards to what makes for an attractive profile for industry?

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Source: Reddit

Is it a conflict of interest to apply to your current employer’s customer?

Is it a conflict of interest to apply to your current employer’s customer?

Just for future reference, I just wanted to know if this was a no-no in the biotech industry. I’ve sent my resume out to plenty of places and the ones I thought I was very qualified for (because they also work with synthetic nucleotides) never called me back and I got calls from other companies not even in the realm of what I currently do. Today I looked at the order list and it turns out our customer were those two companies that I had no idea were affiliated with my company. I was wondering if their HR saw my resume and saw who I worked for and turned me down. I also don’t know the relationship those companies have with my company so I’m afraid they might reach out to my boss and tell him his employee is applying there.

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Source: Reddit

Career Advice?

Career Advice?

I recently accepted a job after i graduate college this semester as a biologist at a relatively new biotech company. Pay is decent (better than other bio major horror stories ive heard of) but the thing is I’d like to try to eventually relocate into the business side of pharma/biotech. Any advice on how to do this internally within my new job? I am also considering getting an MBA within the next several years. The CEO of the company I am working for is a former Yale MBA graduate so I’m hoping to make connections through him with our relatively low employee pool (<60 workers). Thanks for reading this guys I’d appreciate any advice!

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Source: Reddit

Lilly, Avidity to Partner on Immunology Drugs in Up-to-$440M Collaboration

Lilly, Avidity to Partner on Immunology Drugs in Up-to-0M Collaboration

Eli Lilly will use the platform of Avidity Biosciences to develop new treatments in immunology—the pharma giant’s third immunology collaboration announced in the past four months—and other unspecified “select indications,” through a partnership that could generate up to $440 million-plus for the six-year-old startup, the companies said today.

Based in La Jolla, CA, Avidity specializes in developing drugs using its antibody oligonucleotide conjugate (AOC™) technology. AOC seeks to combine the tissue selectivity of monoclonal antibodies and the precision of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics, with the aim of targeting genetic drivers of disease while overcoming barriers to the delivery of oligonucleotides.

Avidity’s AOC approach has shown modulation of disease-related RNAs in immune cells as well as other cell types and tissues, including muscle, heart, liver, and tumors, according to its website.

One of Avidity’s first applications of its technology is in muscle diseases, where the company is advancing a pipeline of therapeutic candidates for disorders that include myotonic dystrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and muscle atrophy. Avidity has said it has demonstrated both RNA interference and exon skipping in studies in vivo, as well as gene-specific knockdown of myostatin in skeletal muscle.

“This collaboration with Lilly provides an exceptional opportunity to leverage Avidity’s proprietary AOC platform in order to generate new therapeutic targets in disease areas that have been challenging to pursue using oligonucleotide-based approaches,” Kent Hawryluk, Avidity’s chief business officer, said in a statement. “Lilly’s extensive research, development, regulatory, and commercial capabilities make them an ideal partner, and we look forward to a long and productive relationship.”

Lilly has agreed to pay Avidity $20 million upfront, an unspecified investment of $15 million—and up to approximately $405 million per target for development, regulatory, and commercialization milestones. Avidity is also eligible for tiered royalties from Lilly that range from the mid-single to low-double digits on product sales.

The companies did not disclose how many targets they will work to develop.

“We are excited to expand our oligonucleotide research and development efforts through this strategic collaboration with Avidity,” added Andrew C. Adams, PhD, CSO for RNA therapeutics at Lilly. “Their expertise in studying the combination of monoclonal antibodies and oligonucleotide-based therapies represent a promising avenue of research toward development of new RNA-based medicines.”

Third immunology collaboration

The alliance with Avidity marks Lilly’s third immunology-focused collaboration in the past four months—and the second in as many months aimed to bolstering its pipeline in autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases.

On March 26, Lilly launched an up-to-$605 million-plus partnership with ImmuNext designed to study and develop a preclinical novel potential target for autoimmune disease treatments. Jay Rothstein, CSO at ImmuNext, described the target in a statement as “a first-in-pathway antibody that specifically targets the metabolism of lymphocytes to reprogram rather than suppress the immune system.”

And in December, Lilly launched a partnership with Aduro Biotech to develop novel immunotherapies for autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases using Aduro’s cGAS-STING Pathway Inhibitor program. Lilly agreed to pay Aduro $12 million upfront and up to approximately $620 million per treatment developed—without saying how many treatments they planned to develop.

Immunology is among Lilly’s areas of therapeutic interest, along with oncology, neuroscience, pain, and diabetes and diabetes-related complications.

Lilly and Avidity said their collaboration transaction is subject to clearance under customary closing conditions.

Lilly also said the deal will be reflected in Lilly’s reported results and financial guidance according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP)—and will not change its 2019 non-GAAP earnings per share (EPS) investor guidance.

In February, Lilly lowered its guidance to between $4.57 and $4.67 on a GAAP reported basis, and between $5.55 to $5.65 on a non-GAAP basis. The company cited anticipated impacts from its $8 billion acquisition of Loxo Oncology, completed February 15, and a negative Phase III confirmatory trial for its marketed cancer drug Lartruvo® (olaratumab) in advanced or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, partially offset by a more favorable underlying business outlook.

Avidity has raised a total $30 million in venture financing. In January 2017, the company announced the completion of a $16 million Series B financing round, consisting of $10 million in new capital investment, and conversion of $6 million in convertible debt.

Takeda Pharmaceutical, through its venture group, led the Series B round, with participation from new and existing investors that included Alethea Capital, Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Brace Pharma, EcoR1 Capital, F-Prime Capital, Moore Venture Partners, and Tavistock Life Sciences.

The post Lilly, Avidity to Partner on Immunology Drugs in Up-to-$440M Collaboration appeared first on GEN – Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News.


Source: Genengnews

DISCOVER-Seq Detects Off-Target CRISPR Effects

DISCOVER-Seq Detects Off-Target CRISPR Effects

A concern that has plagued CRISPR-Cas9 technology from the beginning is the possibility, and unknown effect, of off-target effects—DNA mutations that result from CRISPR-Cas9 editing that are not in the targeted area. In order to understand the effect of off-target changes, they must first be detected. A new universally applicable approach for unbiased off-target identification has been developed. Named DISCOVER-Seq (discovery of in situ Cas off-targets and verification by sequencing), it leverages the recruitment of DNA repair factors in cells and organisms.

The work, from groups at the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI) at the University of California, Berkeley, the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, and AstraZeneca in Sweden, is reported Science in the paper titled, “Unbiased detection of CRISPR off-targets in vivo using DISCOVER-Seq.”

“When CRISPR makes a cut, the DNA is broken,” said Beeke Wienert, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at IGI and first author on the paper. “So, in order to survive, the cell recruits many different DNA repair factors to that particular site in the genome to fix the break and join the cut ends back together. We thought that if we could find the locations of these DNA repair factors, we could identify the sites that have been cut by CRISPR.”

The researchers investigated different DNA repair proteins for their ability to identify Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 target sites by ChIP-Seq. They focused on the MRE11 subunit of the MRN complex, one of the first repair protein recruited to the site of the cut and is found to be “tightly distributed around the Cas9 cut site.” The authors write that “MRE11 binding peaked before the appearance of insertions and deletions (indels) and was readily detected at a known guide RNA (gRNA) off-target.” Using MRE11, DISCOVER-Seq can identify the exact sites in the genome where a cut has been made by CRISPR. Most MRE11 ChIP-Seq reads precisely ended at the predicted Cas9 cut, enabling identification of the nuclease site with single-base resolution. The authors write that, “tracking the precise recruitment of MRE11 uncovers the molecular nature of Cas activity in cells with single-base resolution.”

“The human genome is extremely large—if you printed the entire DNA sequence, you would end up with a novel as tall as a 16-story building,” explained Bruce Conklin, MD, senior investigator at Gladstone and deputy director at IGI. “When we want to cut DNA with CRISPR, it’s like we’re trying to remove one specific word on a particular page in that novel.”

“You can think of the DNA repair factors as different types of bookmarks added to the book,” Conklin added. “While some may bookmark an entire chapter, MRE11 is a bookmark that drills down to the exact letter that has been changed.”

Different methods currently exist to detect CRISPR off-target effects. However, they come with limitations that range from producing false positive results to killing the cells they’re examining. In addition, the most common method used to date is currently limited to being used in cultured cells in the laboratory, excluding its use in patient-derived stem cells or animal tissue.

“Because our method relies on the cell’s natural repair process to identify cuts, it has proven to be much less invasive and much more reliable,” said Jacob Corn, PhD, who now runs a laboratory at ETH Zurich. “We were able to test our new DISCOVER-Seq method in induced pluripotent stem cells, patient cells, and mice, and our findings indicate that this method could potentially be used in any system, rather than just in the lab.”

DISCOVER-Seq works with multiple guide RNA formats and types of Cas enzymes. Off-targets can be identified in cell lines and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and during adenoviral editing of mice, paving the way for in situ off-target discovery within individual patient genotypes during therapeutic genome editing. By being applied to new cell types and systems, DISCOVER-Seq has also revealed new insights into the mechanisms used by CRISPR to edit the genome, which will lead to a better understanding of the biology of how this tool works.

“The new method greatly simplifies the process of identifying off-target effects while also increasing the accuracy of the results,” said Conklin. “This could allow us to better predict how genome editing would work in a clinical setting. As a result, it represents an essential step in improving preclinical studies and bringing CRISPR-based therapies closer to the patients in need.”

The post DISCOVER-Seq Detects Off-Target CRISPR Effects appeared first on GEN – Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News.

Source: Genengnews