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Update: French Biotech Raises €22M for a Gene Therapy Trial in Retinitis Pigmentosa

Update: French Biotech Raises €22M for a Gene Therapy Trial in Retinitis Pigmentosa

Update (18/09/2018): Horama has increased the total raised in its Series B fundraising to €22.5M, with the Belgian fund V-Bio Ventures joining the team of investors backing the company. The funds will be mainly directed at developing Horama’s gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa. 


Published on 08/10/2017

Horama has raised a second fundraising round that will support its lead candidate, a gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa, through clinical trials. 

The French company Horama has announced the closing of its Series B round, which has ammassed a total of €19M. Backing the round are four new investors Kurma Partners, Fund+, Pontifax and Idinvest, as well as existing investors Omnes Capital, GO Capital and Sham Innovation Santé.

The funds will be used to finance the development of Horama’s lead candidate, HORA-PDE6B, which is about to enter clinical trials. Last month, the French ANSM authorized the start of a study at the Nantes University Hospital that will recruit 12 patients to test the gene therapy in humans for the first time.

HORA-PDE6B is intended to cure retinitis pigmentosa in patients that develop the disease because of a mutation in the PDE6β gene, which amounts to around 5,000 people in the US and Europe. The gene therapy consists of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) in which the viral DNA is replaced by a functional copy of the PDE6β gene.

This DNA is injected under the retina, right between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium, where the cells use it to express the correct version of the PDE6β protein. And since these cells are not renewed over time, the therapy has the potential to prove effective for years after a single injection.

With the first gene therapy for an eye disease about to enter the market, Horama could be one of the first to bring forth one that addresses retinitis pigmentosa, along with NightstaRx, a British company that is already testing in the clinic a gene therapy for patients whose retinitis pigmentosa is caused by a mutation in the RPGR gene.


Images via AnnaVel / Shutterstock; Horama

The post Update: French Biotech Raises €22M for a Gene Therapy Trial in Retinitis Pigmentosa appeared first on Labiotech.eu.


Source: Labiotech

Govt TIGS, inStem Hiring Biological Sciences Candidates for Research Fellow Vacancy

Govt TIGS, inStem Hiring Biological Sciences Candidates for Research Fellow Vacancy

Govt TIGS, inStem Hiring Biological Sciences Candidates for Research Fellow Vacancy Government BTech & MSc Biological Sciences junior research fellow vacancies at inStem. inStem is hiring btech & msc biological sciences candidates for jrf vacancies. inStem is hiring btech & msc candidates. Interested and eligible candidates check out all of the details on the same below: This job […]

The post Govt TIGS, inStem Hiring Biological Sciences Candidates for Research Fellow Vacancy appeared first on BioTecNika.

Source: Biotecnika

Govt Biotech/Food Tech & Life Sciences Recruitment @ Punjab Biotechnology Incubator (PBTI)

Govt Biotech/Food Tech & Life Sciences Recruitment @ Punjab Biotechnology Incubator (PBTI)

Govt Biotech/Food Tech & Life Sciences Recruitment @ PBTI Government jobs for phd, msc and mtech biosciences candidates. Life sciences, biotech and food tech jobs for msc, mtech and phd candidates at Punjab Biotechnology Incubator (PBTI). Punjab Biotechnology Incubator (PBTI) is hiring for project associate post with a high salary, check out all of the details on […]

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Source: Biotecnika

Biotecnika Times – Newsletter 18.09.2018 – DST INSPIRE Fellowship, 50+ Govt SSC Jobs

Biotecnika Times – Newsletter 18.09.2018 – DST INSPIRE Fellowship, 50+ Govt SSC Jobs

Biotecnika Times – DST INSPIRE Fellowship, 50+ Govt SSC Jobs INSPIRE FELLOWSHIP for Pursuing Doctoral Programme – Department of Science & Technology The call for the INSPIRE Fellowship for Pursuing Doctoral Programme in Science & Technology has been released. Interested candidates can check out all of the details on the………….. Read More 50+ Biosciences Govt Staff Selection Commission (SSC) […]

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Source: Biotecnika

Currently studying biomedical computing and hoping to do private sector research. Any advice?

Currently studying biomedical computing and hoping to do private sector research. Any advice?

I'm in my 3rd year of undergrad, going down a stream of computer science offered at my school called biomedical computing (it involves take a mix of computing and biology classes, and those computing classes are all applications of computer science useful for various topics in biology).

My main reason for going into biomedical computing was so I could do research on a topic I'm really interested in, and that goal hasn't changed. But I'm wondering how I should go about it.

As far as I know, there are two options for doing research:

I can stay in academia and get a Masters and then a PhD, and become a professor so I can conduct my own research (I imagine it'd be my students doing most of the research, but I'd have more influence over the topic being researched. That's how it works at my school at least).

The second options would be to go into the private sector and do research for some private company (ideally a company who is researching what I want to research, but I realize I might need more experience before I can get what I want). I prefer this route, because doing research at a university usually means that you aren't spending the majority of your time doing research (I've heard of a 40/40/20 rule for profs where, in general, 40% of their time is spent on research, 40% on teaching, and 20% on administrative tasks). I want to devote myself to the research and not have to spend time doing other things.

Money is not the priority, but obviously it'd be great to have a nice salary. I also realize that, even if I don't become a professor, I might need at least a Masters if I want to get into private sector research.

Any general advice you have for me? Such as whether my thinking is correct on the academia vs. private sector thing, some clarifications on how private sector research really works, whether I'm forgetting any factors, etc. It doesn't matter if you're not a researcher or even in a biotech related position, I still lack of lot of knowledge, so any info is helpful.

TLDR Looking do to private sector research because I'm under the impression that will allow me to focus more than if I were to do research in academia (and those two seem to be the only two options). Any advice at all is welcome and appreciated.

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Source: Reddit

The Current Scientific and Regulatory Landscape in Advancing Integrated Continuous Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing

The Current Scientific and Regulatory Landscape in Advancing Integrated Continuous Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing
There is a trend across the pharmaceutical sector toward process intensification and continuous manufacturing to produce small-molecule drugs or biotechnology products. For biotechnology products, advancing the manufacturing technology behind upstream and downstream processes has the potential to reduce product shortages and variability, allow for production flexibility, simplify scale-up procedures, improve product quality, reduce facility footprints, increase productivity, and reduce production costs.

Source: Inpress

Molecularly Imprinted Polymers in Electrochemical and Optical Sensors

Molecularly Imprinted Polymers in Electrochemical and Optical Sensors
Molecular imprinting is the process of template-induced formation of specific recognition sites in a polymer. Synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting possess a unique combination of properties such as robustness, high affinity, specificity, and low-cost production, which makes them attractive alternatives to natural receptors. Improvements in polymer science and nanotechnology have contributed to enhanced performance of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) sensors. Encouragingly, recent years have seen an increase in high-quality publications describing MIP sensors for the determination of biomolecules, drugs of abuse, and explosives, driving toward applications of this technology in medical and forensic diagnostics.

Source: Inpress